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GitHub - vobyjs/voby: A high-performance framework with fine-grained observable-...

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source link: https://github.com/vobyjs/voby
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Voby

A high-performance framework with fine-grained observable-based reactivity for building rich applications.

Features

This works similarly to Solid, but without the need for the Babel transform and with a different API.

  • No VDOM: there's no VDOM overhead, the framework deals with raw DOM nodes directly.
  • No stale closures: functions are always executed afresh, no need to worry about previous potential executions of the current function, ever.
  • No rules of hooks: hooks are just regular functions, which you can nest indefinitely, call conditionally, use outside components, whatever you want.
  • No dependencies arrays: the framework is able to detect what depends on what else automatically, no need to specify dependencies manually.
  • No props diffing: updates are fine grained, there's no props diffing, whenever an attribute/property/class/handler/etc. should be updated it's updated directly and immediately.
  • No key prop: you can just map over arrays, or use the For component with an array of unique values, no need to specify keys explicitly.
  • No Babel: there's no need to use Babel with this framework, it works with plain old JS (plus JSX if you are into that). As a consequence we have 0 transform function bugs, because we don't have a transform function.
  • No magic: what you see if what you get, your code is not transformed to actually do something different than what you write, there are no surprises.
  • No server support: for the time being this framework is focused on local-first rich applications, ~no server-related features are implemented: no hydration, no server components, no SSR, no streaming etc.
  • Observable-based: observables are at the core of our reactivity system. The way it works is very different from a React-like system, it may be more challenging to learn, but it's well worth the effort.
  • Work in progress: this is probably beta software, I'm working on it because I need something with great performance for Notable, I'm allergic to third-party dependencies, I'd like something with an API that resonates with me, and I wanted to deeply understand how the more solid Solid, which you should also check out, works.

Demos

You can find some demos and benchmarks below, more demos are contained inside the repository.

Usage

This framework is simply a view layer built on top of the Observable library oby, knowing how that works is necessary to understand how this works.

This framework basically re-exports everything that oby exports, sometimes with a slightly different interface, adjusted for usage as components or hooks, plus some additional functions.

The following is going to be a very shallow documentation of the API. As I mentioned this probably isn't production-grade software, it may become that in the future though, are you interested?

Methods

The following top-level functions are provided.

$

This function is just the default export of oby, it can be used to wrap a value in an observable.

No additional methods are attached to this function. Everything that oby attaches to it is instead exported as components and hooks.

Read upstream documentation.

Interface:

function $ <T> (): Observable<T | undefined>;
function $ <T> ( value: undefined, options?: ObservableOptions<T | undefined> ): Observable<T | undefined>;
function $ <T> ( value: T, options?: ObservableOptions<T> ): Observable<T>;

Usage:

import {$} from 'voby';

$ // => Same as require ( 'oby' ).default

$$

This function unwraps a potentially observable value.

Read upstream documentation.

Interface:

function $$ <T> ( value: T ): (T extends ObservableReadonly<infer U> ? U : T);

Usage:

import {$$} from 'voby';

$$ // => Same as require ( 'oby' ).get

createContext

This function creates a context object, optionally with a default value, which can later be used to provide a new value for the context or to read the current value.

Interface:

type ContextConsumer<T> = ( props: { children: (( value?: T ) => JSX.Element) } ) => JSX.Element;
type ContextProvider<T> = ( props: { value: T, children: JSX.Element } ) => JSX.Element;
type Context<T> = { Consumer: ContextConsumer<T>, Provider: ContextProvider<T> };

function createContext <T> ( defaultValue?: T ): Context<T>;

Usage:

import {createContext} from 'voby';

const App = () => {
  const Context = createContext ( 123 );
  return (
    <>
      <Context.Consumer>
        {value => <p>{value}</p>}
      </Context.Consumer>
      <Context.Provider value={312}>
        <Context.Consumer>
          {value => <p>{value}</p>}
        </Context.Consumer>
      </Context.Provider>
    </>
  );
};

createElement

This is the internal function that will make DOM nodes and call/instantiate components, it will be called for you automatically via JSX.

Interface:

function createElement <P = {}> ( component: JSX.Component<P>, props: P | null, ...children: JSX.Element[] ): () => JSX.Element);

Usage:

import {createElement} from 'voby';

const element = createElement ( 'div', { class: 'foo' }, 'child' ); // => () => HTMLDivElement

h

This function is just an alias for the createElement function, it's more convenient to use if you want to use Voby in hyperscript mode just because it has a much shorter name.

Interface:

function h <P = {}> ( component: JSX.Component<P>, props: P | null, ...children: JSX.Element[] ): () => JSX.Element);

Usage:

import {h} from 'voby';

const element = h ( 'div', { class: 'foo' }, 'child' ); // => () => HTMLDivElement

isObservable

This function tells you if a variable is an observable or not.

Interface:

function isObservable <T = unknown> ( value: unknown ): value is Observable<T> | ObservableReadonly<T>;

Usage:

import {$, isObservable} from 'voby';

isObservable ( 123 ); // => false
isObservable ( $(123) ); // => true

lazy

This function creates a lazy component, which is loaded via the provided function only when/if needed.

This function uses useResource internally, so it's significant for Suspense too.

Interface:

type LazyComponent<P = {}> = ( props: P ) => ObservableReadonly<Child>;
type LazyFetcher<P = {}> = () => Promise<{ default: ComponentClass<P> | ComponentFunction<P> }>;
type LazyResult<P = {}> = LazyComponent<P> & ({ preload: () => Promise<void> });

function lazy <P = {}> ( fetcher: LazyFetcher<P> ): LazyResult<P>;

Usage:

import {lazy} from 'voby';

const LazyComponent = lazy ( () => import ( './Component' ) );

render

This function mounts a component inside a provided DOM element and returns a disposer function for unmounting it and stopping all reactivity inside it.

Interface:

function render ( child: JSX.Element, parent?: HTMLElement | null ): Disposer;

Usage:

import {render} from 'voby';

const App = () => <p>Hello, World!</p>;

const dispose = render ( <App />, document.body );

dispose (); // Unmounted and all reactivity inside it stopped

renderToString

This works just like render, but it returns a Promise to the HTML representation of the rendered component.

This is currently implemented in a way that works only inside a browser-like environement, so you'll need to use JSDOM or similar for this to work server-side, but it can work server-side too potentially.

This function automatically waits for all Suspense boundaries to resolve before returning.

Interface:

function renderToString ( child: JSX.Element ): Promise<string>;

Usage:

import {renderToString} from 'voby';

const App = () => <p>Hello, World!</p>;

const html = await renderToString ( <App /> );

resolve

This function basically resolves any reactivity inside the passed argument, basically replacing every function it finds with a computed to the value of that function.

You may never need to use this function yourself, but it's necessary internally at times to make sure that a child value is properly tracked by its parent computation.

Read upstream documentation.

Interface:

type ResolvablePrimitive = null | undefined | boolean | number | bigint | string | symbol;
type ResolvableArray = Resolvable[];
type ResolvableObject = { [Key in string | number | symbol]?: Resolvable };
type ResolvableFunction = () => Resolvable;
type Resolvable = ResolvablePrimitive | ResolvableObject | ResolvableArray | ResolvableFunction;

function resolve <T> ( value: T ): T extends Resolvable ? T : never;

Usage:

import {resolve} from 'voby';

resolve // => Same as require ( 'oby' ).resolve

template

This function enables constructing elements with Solid-level performance without using the Babel transform, but also without the convenience of that.

It basically works like sinuous's template function, but with a cleaner API, since you don't have to access your props any differently inside the template here.

Basically you can use this to wrap a component that doesn't directly create any observables or call any hooks to significanly improve performance when instantiating that component.

Interface:

type TemplateOptions = { recycle?: boolean };

function template <P = {}> ( fn: (( props: P ) => JSX.Element), options: TemplateOptions = {} ): (( props: P ) => () => Element);

Usage:

import {template} from 'voby';

const Row = template ( ({ id, cls, label, onSelect, onRemove }) => { // Now Row is super fast to instantiate
  return (
    <tr class={cls}>
      <td class="col-md-1">{id}</td>
      <td class="col-md-4">
        <a onClick={onSelect}>{label}</a>
      </td>
      <td class="col-md-1">
        <a onClick={onRemove}>
          <span class="glyphicon glyphicon-remove" ariaHidden={true}></span>
        </a>
      </td>
      <td class="col-md-6"></td>
    </tr>
  );
});

const Table = () => {
  const rows = [ /* props for all your rows here */ ];
  return rows.map ( row => <Row {...row}> );
};

Components

The following components are provided.

Crucially some components are provided for control flow, since regular JavaScript control flow primitives are not reactive, and we need to have reactive alternatives to them to have great performance.

Component

This is the base class for your class-based components, if you are into that.

The nice thing about class-based components is that you get ref assignment for free, the eventual ref passed to a class component will automatically receive the class instance corresponding to the component. The class component itself doesn't even need to know about this, but automatically it is able to provide access to its public API to however asks for it.

Interface:

class Component<P = {}> {
  props: P;
  render ( props: P ): JSX.Element;
}

Usage:

import {Component} from 'voby';

class App extends Component<{ value: number }> {
  render ( ({ value }) ): JSX.Element {
    return <p>Value: {value}</p>;
  }
};

Dynamic

This component is just an alternative to createElement that can be used in JSX, it's useful to create a new element dynamically.

Interface:

function Dynamic <P = {}> ( props: { component: ObservableMaybe<JSX.Component<P>, props?: ObservableMaybe<P | null>, children: JSX.Element }): JSX. Element;

Usage:

import {Dynamic} from 'voby';

const App = () => {
  const heading = 'h2';
  return (
    <Dynamic component={heading}>
      Some content
    </Dynamic>
  );
};

ErrorBoundary

The error boundary catches errors thrown inside it, and renders a fallback component when that happens.

Interface:

function ErrorBoundary ( props: { fallback: JSX.Element | (( props: { error: Error, reset: Disposer } ) => JSX.Element), children: JSX.Element }): ObservableReadonly<JSX.Element>;

Usage:

import {ErrorBoundary} from 'voby';

const Fallback = ({ reset, error }: { reset: () => void, error: Error }) => {
  return (
    <>
      <p>Error: {error.message}</p>
      <button onClick={error}>Recover</button>
    </>
  );
};

const SomeComponentThatThrows = () => {
  throw 'whatever';
};

const App = () => {
  return (
    <ErrorBoundary fallback={Fallback}>
      <SomeComponentThatThrows />
    </ErrorBoundary>
  );
};

For

This component is the reactive alternative to natively mapping over an array.

It must be called with an array, or a function that returns an array, of unique values, and each of them are passed to the child function to render something.

Interface:

function For <T> ( props: { values: FunctionMaybe<T[]>, fallback?: JSX.Element, children: (( value: T ) => JSX.Element) }): ObservableReadonly<JSX.Element>;

Usage:

import {For} from 'voby';

const App = () => {
  const numbers = [1, 2, 3, 4, 5];
  return (
    <For values={numbers}>
      {( value ) => {
        return <p>Value: {value}</p>
      }}
    </For>
  );
};

Fragment

This is just the internal component used for rendering fragments: <></>, you probably would never use this directly even if you are not using JSX, since you can return plain arrays from your components anyway.

Interface:

function Fragment ( props: { children: JSX.Element }): JSX.Element;

Usage:

import {Fragment} from 'voby';

const App = () => {
  return (
    <Fragment>
      <p>child 1</p>
      <p>child 2</p>
    </Fragment>
  );
};

If

This component is the reactive alternative to the native if.

Interface:

function If ( props: { when: FunctionMaybe<unknown>, fallback?: JSX.Element, children: JSX.Element }): ObservableReadonly<JSX.Element>;

Usage:

import {If} from 'voby';

const App = () => {
  const visible = $(false);
  const toggle = () => visible ( !visible () );
  return (
    <>
      <button onClick={toggle}>Toggle</button>
      <If when={visible}>
        <p>Hello!</p>
      </If>
    </>
  );
};

Portal

This component mounts its children inside a provided DOM element, or inside document.body otherwise.

Events will propagate natively, according to the resulting DOM hierarchy, not the components hierarchy.

Interface:

function Portal ( props: { mount?: HTMLElement | null, children: JSX.Element }): (() => null) & ({ metadata: { portal: HTMLDivElement } });

Usage:

import Portal from 'voby';

const Modal = () => {
  // Some modal component maybe...
};

const App = () => {
  return (
    <Portal mount={document.body}>
      <Modal />
    </Portal>
  );
};

Suspense

This component is like If, the reactive alternative to the native if, but both branches are kept alive under the hood at the same time, and the fallback branch is shown automatically while there are some resources loading in the main branch.

So this can be used to show some fallback content while the actual content is loading in the background.

This component relies on useResource to understand if there's a resource loading or not.

Interface:

function Suspense ( props: { fallback?: JSX.Element, children: JSX.Element }): ObservableReadonly<JSX.Element>;

Usage:

import {Suspense} from 'voby';

const App = () => {
  const Content = () => {
    const resource = useResource ( () => makeSomePromise () );
    return (
      <Show when={() => !resource ().loading && !resource ().error}>
        {resource ().value}
      </Show>
    );
  };
  const Spinner = () => {
    return <p>Loading...</p>;
  };
  return (
    <Suspense fallback={<Spinner />}>
      <Content />
    </Suspense>
  );
};

Switch

This component is the reactive alternative to the native switch.

Interface:

function Switch <T> ( props: { when: FunctionMaybe<T>, children: JSX.Element }): ObservableReadonly<JSX.Element>;

Switch.Case = function <T> ( props: { when: T, children: JSX.Element } ): (() => JSX.Element) & ({ metadata: [T, JSX.Element] });
Switch.Default = function ( props: { children: JSX.Element } ): (() => JSX.Element) & ({ metadata: [JSX.Element] });

Usage:

import {Switch} from 'voby';

const App = () => {
  const value = $(0);
  const increment = () => value ( value () + 1 );
  const decrement = () => value ( value () - 1 );
  return (
    <>
      <Switch when={value}>
        <Switch.Case when={0}>
          <p>0, the boundary between positives and negatives! (?)</p>
        </Switch.Case>
        <Switch.Case when={1}>
          <p>1, the multiplicative identity!</p>
        </Switch.Case>
        <Switch.Default>
          <p>{value}, I don't have anything interesting to say about that :(</p>
        </Switch.Default>
      </Switch>
      <button onClick={increment}>+</button>
      <button onClick={decrement}>-</button>
    </>
  );
};

Ternary

This component is the reactive alternative to the native ternary operator.

The first child will be rendered when the condition is truthy, otherwise the second child will be rendered.

Interface:

function Ternary ( props: { when: FunctionMaybe<unknown>, children: [JSX.Element, JSX.Element] } ): ObservableReadonly<JSX.Element>;

Usage:

import {Ternary} from 'voby';

const App = () => {
  const visible = $(false);
  const toggle = () => visible ( !visible () );
  return (
    <>
      <button onClick={toggle}>Toggle</button>
      <Ternary when={visible}>
        <p>Visible :)</p>
        <p>Invisible :(</p>
      </Ternary>
    </>
  );
};

Hooks

The following hooks are provided.

Many of these are just functions that oby provides, re-exported as use* functions, the rest are largely just alternatives to web built-ins that can also accept observables as arguments and can dispose of themselves automatically when the parent computation is disposed.

Hooks are just regular functions, if their name starts with use then we call them hooks just because.

useAbortController

This hook is just an alternative to new AbortController () that automatically aborts itself when the parent computation is disposed.

Interface:

function useAbortController ( signals?: ArrayMaybe<AbortSignal> ): AbortController;

Usage:

import {useAbortController} from 'voby';

const controller = useAbortController ();

useAbortSignal

This hook is just a convenient alternative to useAbortController, if you are only interested in its signal, which is automatically aborted when the parent computation is disposed.

Interface:

function useAbortSignal ( signals?: ArrayMaybe<AbortSignal> ): AbortSignal;

Usage:

import {useAbortSignal} from 'voby';

const signal = useAbortSignal ();

useAnimationFrame

This hook is just an alternative to requestAnimationFrame that automatically clears itself when the parent computation is disposed.

Interface:

function useAnimationFrame ( callback: ObservableMaybe<FrameRequestCallback> ): Disposer;

Usage:

import {useAnimationFrame} from 'voby';

useAnimationFrame ( () => console.log ( 'called' ) );

useAnimationLoop

This hook is just a version of useAnimationFrame that loops until the parent computation is disposed.

Interface:

function useAnimationLoop ( callback: ObservableMaybe<FrameRequestCallback> ): Disposer;

Usage:

import {useAnimationLoop} from 'voby';

useAnimationLoop ( () => console.log ( 'called' ) );

useBatch

This hook holds onto updates within its scope and flushes them out at once once it exits.

Read upstream documentation.

Interface:

function useBatch <T> ( fn: () => T ): T;
function useBatch <T> ( value: T ): T;

Usage:

import {useBatch} from 'voby';

useBatch // => Same as require ( 'oby' ).batch

useCleanup

This hook registers a function to be called when the parent computation is disposed.

Read upstream documentation.

Interface:

function useCleanup ( fn: () => void ): void;

Usage:

import {useCleanup} from 'voby';

useCleanup // => Same as require ( 'oby' ).cleanup

useComputed

This hook is the crucial other ingredient that we need, other than observables themselves, to have a powerful reactive system that can track dependencies and re-execute computations when needed.

This hook registers a function to be called when any of its dependencies change, and the return of that function is wrapped in a read-only observable and returned.

Read upstream documentation.

Interface:

function useComputed <T> ( fn: () => T, options?: ObservableOptions<T | undefined> ): ObservableReadonly<T>;

Usage:

import {useComputed} from 'voby';

useComputed // => Same as require ( 'oby' ).computed

useContext

This hook retrieves the value out of a context object.

Interface:

function useContext <T> ( context: Context<T> ): T | undefined;

Usage:

import {createContext, useContext} from 'voby';

const App = () => {
  const ctx = createContext ( 123 );
  const value = useContext ( ctx );
  return <p>{value}</p>;
};

useDisposed

This hook returns a boolean read-only observable that is set to true when the parent computation gets disposed of.

Read upstream documentation.

Interface:

function useDisposed (): ObservableReadonly<boolean>;

Usage:

import {useDisposed} from 'voby';

useDisposed // => Same as require ( 'oby' ).disposed

useEffect

This hook registers a function to be called when any of its dependencies change. If a function is returned it's automatically registered as a cleanup function.

Read upstream documentation.

Interface:

function useEffect ( fn: () => (() => void) | void ): (() => void);

Usage:

import {useEffect} from 'voby';

useEffect // => Same as require ( 'oby' ).effect

useError

This hook registers a function to be called when the parent computation throws.

Read upstream documentation.

Interface:

function useError ( fn: ( error: Error ) => void ): void;

Usage:

import {useError} from 'voby';

useError // => Same as require ( 'oby' ).error

useEventListener

This hook is just an alternative to addEventListener that automatically clears itself when the parent computation is disposed.

Interface:

function useEventListener ( target: ObservableMaybe<EventTarget>, event: ObservableMaybe<string>, handler: ObservableMaybe<( event: Event ) => void>, options?: ObservableMaybe<true | AddEventListenerOptions> ): Disposer;

Usage:

import {useEventListener} from 'voby';

useEventListener ( document, 'click', console.log );

useFetch

This hook wraps the output of a fetch request in an observable, so that you can be notified when it resolves or rejects. The request is also aborted automatically when the parent computation gets disposed of.

This hook uses useResource internally, so it's significant for Suspense too.

Interface:

function useFetch ( request: ObservableMaybe<RequestInfo>, init?: ObservableMaybe<RequestInit> ): ObservableReadonly<Resource<Response>>;

Usage:

import {useFetch} from 'voby';

const App = () => {
  const state = useFetch ( 'https://my.api' );
  return state.on ( state => {
    if ( state.loading ) return <p>loading...</p>;
    if ( state.error ) return <p>{state.error.message}</p>;
    return <p>Status: {state.value.status}</p>
  });
};

useIdleCallback

This hook is just an alternative to requestIdleCallback that automatically clears itself when the parent computation is disposed.

Interface:

function useIdleCallback ( callback: ObservableMaybe<IdleRequestCallback>, options?: ObservableMaybe<IdleRequestOptions> ): Disposer;

Usage:

import {useIdleCallback} from 'voby';

useIdleCallback ( () => console.log ( 'called' ) );

useIdleLoop

This hook is just a version of useIdleCallback that loops until the parent computation is disposed.

Interface:

function useIdleLoop ( callback: ObservableMaybe<IdleRequestCallback>, options?: ObservableMaybe<IdleRequestOptions> ): Disposer;

Usage:

import {useIdleLoop} from 'voby';

useIdleLoop ( () => console.log ( 'called' ) );

useInterval

This hook is just an alternative to setInterval that automatically clears itself when the parent computation is disposed.

Interface:

function useInterval ( callback: ObservableMaybe<Callback>, ms?: ObservableMaybe<number> ): Disposer;

Usage:

import {useInterval} from 'voby';

useInterval ( () => console.log ( 'called' ), 1000 );

useMicrotask

This hook is just an alternative to queueMicrotask that automatically clears itself when the parent computation is disposed, and that ensures things like contexts, error boundaries etc. keep working inside the microtask.

Interface:

function useMicrotask ( fn: () => void ): void;

Usage:

import {useMicrotask} from 'voby';

useMicrotask ( () => console.log ( 'called' ) );

usePromise

This hook wraps a promise in an observable, so that you can be notified when it resolves or rejects.

This hook uses useResource internally, so it's significant for Suspense too.

Interface:

function usePromise <T> ( promise: ObservableMaybe<Promise<T>> ): ObservableReadonly<Resource<T>>;

Usage:

import {usePromise} from 'voby';

const App = () => {
  const request = fetch ( 'https://my.api' ).then ( res => res.json ( 0 ) );
  const promise = usePromise ( request );
  return resolved.on ( state => {
    if ( state.loading ) return <p>loading...</p>;
    if ( state.error ) return <p>{state.error.message}</p>;
    return <p>{JSON.stringify ( state.value )}</p>
  });
};

useReadonly

This hook creates a read-only observable out of another observable.

Read upstream documentation.

Interface:

function useReadonly <T> ( observable: Observable<T> | ObservableReadonly<T> ): ObservableReadonly<T>;

Usage:

import {useReadonly} from 'voby';

useReadonly // => Same as require ( 'oby' ).readonly

useResolved

This hook receives a value, or an array of values, potentially wrapped in functions and/or observables, and unwraps it/them.

If no callback is used then it returns the unwrapped value, otherwise it returns whatever the callback returns.

This is useful for handling reactive and non reactive values the same way. Usually if the value is a function, or always for convenience, you'd want to wrap the useResolved call in a useComputed, to maintain reactivity.

This is potentially a more convenient version of $$, made especially for handling nicely arguments passed that your hooks receive that may or may not be observables.

Interface:

The precise interface for this function is insane, you can find it here: https://github.com/fabiospampinato/voby/blob/master/src/hooks/use_resolved.ts

Usage:

import {$, useResolved} from 'voby';

useResolved ( 123 ); // => 123

useResolved ( $(123) ); // => 123

useResolved ( () => 123 ); // => () => 123

useResolved ( () => 123, true ); // => 123

useResolved ( $(123), value => 321 ); // => 321

useResolved ( [$(123), () => 123], ( a, b ) => 321, true ); // => 321

useResource

This hook wraps the result of a function call with an observable, handling the cases where the function throws, the result is an observable, the result is a promise or an observale that resolves to a promise, and the promise rejects, so that you don't have to worry about these issues.

This basically provides a unified way to handle sync and async results, observable and non observable results, and functions that throw and don't throw.

This function is also the mechanism through which Suspense understands if there are things loading under the hood or not.

Interface:

function useResource <T> ( fetcher: (() => ObservableMaybe<PromiseMaybe<T>>) ): ObservableReadonly<Resource<T>>;

Usage:

import {useResource} from 'voby';

const fetcher = () => fetch ( 'https://my.api' );

const resource = useResource ( fetcher );

useRoot

This hook creates a new computation root, detached from any parent computation.

Read upstream documentation.

Interface:

function useRoot <T> ( fn: ( dispose: () => void ) => T ): T;

Usage:

import {useRoot} from 'voby';

useRoot // => Same as require ( 'oby' ).root

useSample

This hook executes the provided function without creating dependencies on observables retrieved inside it.

Read upstream documentation.

Interface:

function useSample <T> ( fn: () => T ): T;
function useSample <T> ( value: T ): T;

Usage:

import {useSample} from 'voby';

useSample // => Same as require ( 'oby' ).sample

useSelector

This hook massively optimizes isSelected kind of workloads.

Read upstream documentation.

Interface:

function useSelector <T> ( observable: Observable<T> | ObservableReadonly<T> ): (( value: T ) => boolean);

Usage:

import {useSelector} from 'voby';

useSelector // => Same as require ( 'oby' ).selector

useTimeout

This hook is just an alternative to setTimeout that automatically clears itself when the parent computation is disposed.

Interface:

function useTimeout ( callback: ObservableMaybe<Callback>, ms?: ObservableMaybe<number> ): Disposer;

Usage:

import {useTimeout} from 'voby';

useTimeout ( () => console.log ( 'called' ), 1000 );

Types

FunctionMaybe

This type says that something can be the value itself or a function that returns that value.

It's useful at times since some components, like If, accept when conditions wrapped in FunctionMaybe.

Interface:

type FunctionMaybe<T> = (() => T) | T;

Usage:

import type {FunctionMaybe} from 'voby';

const SomeConditionalComponent = ( when: FunctionMaybe<boolean>, value: string ): JSX.Element => {
  return (
    <If when={when}>
      {value}
    </If>
  );
};

Observable

This type says that something is a regular observable, which can be updated via its setter.

Interface:

type Observable<T> = {
  (): T,
  ( value: T ): T,
  ( fn: ( value: T ) => T ): T
};

Usage:

import type {Observable} from 'voby';

const fn = ( value: Observable<boolean> ): void => {
  value (); // Getting
  value ( true ); // Setting
};

ObservableReadonly

This type says that something is a read-only observable, which can only be read but not updated.

Interface:

type ObservableReadonly<T> = {
  (): T
};

Usage:

import type {ObservableReadonly} from 'voby';

const fn = ( value: ObservableReadonly<boolean> ): void => {
  value (); // Getting
  value ( true ); // This will throw!
};

ObservableMaybe

This type says that something can be the value itself or an observable to that value.

This is super useful if you want to write components and hooks that can accept either plain values or observables to those values.

Interface:

type ObservableMaybe<T> = Observable<T> | ObservableReadonly<T> | T;

Usage:

import type {ObservableMaybe} from 'voby';

const Button = ({ label }: { label: ObservableMaybe<string> }): JSX.Element => {
  return <button>{label}</button>;
};

ObservableOptions

This type describes the options object that various functions can accept to tweak how the underlying observable works.

Interface:

type ObservableOptions<T> = {
  equals?: (( value: T, valuePrev: T ) => boolean) | false
};

Usage:

import type {Observable, ObservableOptions} from 'voby';
import {$} from 'voby';

const createTimestamp = ( options?: ObservableOptions ): Observable<number> => {
  return $( Date.now (), options );
};

Resource

This is the type of object that useResource, usePromise and useFetch will return you.

It's an object that tells if whether the resource is loading or not, whether an error happened or not, if what the eventual resulting value is.

Interface:

type ResourceLoading = { loading: true, error?: never, value?: never };
type ResourceRejected = { loading: false, error: Error, value?: never };
type ResourceResolved<T> = { loading: false, error?: never, value: T };
type Resource<T> = ResourceLoading | ResourceRejected | ResourceResolved<T>;

Usage:

import type {ObservableReadonly, Resource} from 'voby';

const resource: ObservableReadonly<Resource> = useResource ( () => fetch ( 'https://my.api' ) );

resource ().loading // => true | false
resource ().error // => Error | undefined
resource ().value // => Whatever the resource will resolve to

F

This type is just a convenient alias for FunctionMaybe, because typing FunctionMaybe a lot can be annoying.

Interface:

type F<T> = FunctionMaybe<T>;

Usage:

import type {F} from 'voby';

const SomeConditionalComponent = ( when: F<boolean>, value: string ): JSX.Element => {
  return (
    <If when={when}>
      {value}
    </If>
  );
};

O

This type is just a convenient alias for ObservableMaybe, because typing ObservableMaybe a lot can be annoying.

Interface:

type O<T> = ObservableMaybe<T>;

Usage:

import type {O} from 'voby';

const Button = ({ label }: { label: O<string> }): JSX.Element => {
  return <button>{label}</button>;
};

Extras

Extra features and details.

JSX

JSX is supported out of the box, as a rule of thumb it's very similar to how React's JSX works, but with some differences.

  • The value provided to an attribute can always be either just the plain value itself, an observable to that value, or a function to that value. If an observable or a function is provided then that attribute will update itself in a fine-grained manner.
  • There's no "key" attribute because it's unnecessary.
  • Only refs in the function form are supported, so you are incentivized to simply use observables for them too.
  • A ref function attached to a DOM element will also be called with undefined when that node is unmounted.
  • The "ref" attribute can also accept an array of functions to call, for convenience.
  • You can simply just use "class" instead of "className".
  • The "class" attribute can also accept an object of classes, for convenience.
  • SVGs are supported out of the box and will also be updated in a fine-grained manner.
  • The "innerHTML", "outerHTML" and "textContent" attributes are forbidden, as they are largely just footguns.
  • A React-like "dangerouslySetInnerHTML" attribute is supported for setting some raw HTML.
  • Numbers set as values for style properties that require a unit to be provided will automatically be suffixed with "px".
  • Using CSS variables in the "style" object is supported out of the box.
  • The following events are delegated, automatically: beforeinput, click, dblclick, focusin, focusout, input, keydown, keyup, mousedown, mouseup.
  • Events always bubble according to the natural DOM hierarchy, there's no special bubbling logic for Portal.
  • Class components, but with no lifecycle callbacks, are supported too. They got thrown away with the bath water by other frameworks, but organizing internal methods in a class and assigning that class to refs automatically is actually a really nice feature.

Tree Shaking

Voby is released as a tree-shakeable ESM module. The functions you don't use simply won't be included in the final bundle.

TypeScript

There are two main actions needed to make Voby work with TypeScript.

  1. Voby is an ESM-only framework, so you might need to mark your package as ESM too in order to use it, you can do that by putting the following in your package.json:
    "type": "module"
    
  2. You should instruct TypeScript to load the correct JSX types by putting the following in your tsconfig.json:
    "jsx": "preserve",
    "jsxImportSource": "voby",
    
  3. Optionally, if you don't want to use a bundler or if you are using a bundler for which a plugin hasn't been written yet you can just define a "React" variable in scope and just use the JSX transform for React:
    import * as React from 'voby';

Thanks

  • S: for paving the way to this awesome reactive way of writing software.
  • sinuous/observable: for making me fall in love with Observables and providing a good implementation that this library is based of.
  • solid: for being a great sort of reference implementation, popularizing Signal-based reactivity, and having built a great community.
  • trkl: for being so inspiringly small.

License

MIT © Fabio Spampinato


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